Dan Berger

Archive by category ''Dan Berger

  • DAN BERGER

    Pinot Gris earning some respect

    A joke making the rounds of wine makers a decade ago wasn’t so funny: There was a blind tasting between Pinot Gris and Perrier water. And Perrier won.

  • DAN BERGER

    Grenache: the Rhône’s other great red

    The conventional way of thinking about the Rhône Valley and its red wines is that Syrah is king. That surely is evident from the fact that the best wines from the northern Rhône are wines like Hermitage and Côte-Rôtie – powerful statements of how good Syrah can be.

  • WINTER 2013

    The Great White North

    For decades, red wine was considered the best wine in the world. Phrases like “All wine would be red if it could,” and “White wine is what you drink until someone opens a red” were spoken more in truth than jest. Even today, those who rate wines consider that the greatest...

  • FALL 2013

    Evaluating reds from Italian grapes

    Do you choose the wine first or the food?

  • SUMMER 2013

    Yakima Valley

    Preconceived notions are insidious and can lead to some wrong-headed thinking. This has affected many things, and among the least discussed is how it works in the world of wine.

  • SPRING 2013

    Wine Maker of the Year

    In 1989, while I was wine columnist for The Los Angeles Times, I began to name one person as Wine Maker of the Year for exemplary work.

  • WINTER 2012

    Finding distinctiveness in the Umpqua

    A recent epiphany has led me to believe that greatness in wine can be a result primarily of superb fruit, insightful grape growing and winemaking, and most crucially a distinctiveness that is born of various factors, including terroir.

  • FALL 2012

    Finally finding a distinctive Malbec

    There is no accounting for taste, of course, so when you read that a bottle of Malbec rates a score of 94, you make the assumption the reviewer liked the thing.

  • SUMMER 2012

    Developing tourism no simple task

    My first visit to the Napa Valley, in the early 1970s, was a revelation: There was no traffic, no tourist mobs and no parking woes. But that was partly because there were few wineries, no public restrooms and, notably, no food infrastructure.

  • DAN BERGER

    Malbec not Washington's next big red

    I hear tell that some folks out there in the hinterlands are fixin' to plant some of that there Malbek, or however it's spelt, and that some already have, and I kinda feel like I'm the guy who done brung my pet pig to a formal dinner party.

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